City of Wenatchee Looking to Update Water Use Efficiency GoalsAdditional Fire Restrictions

first_imgThe City of Wenatchee is looking to update its water use efficiency goals, something they do every six years. Environmental Manager Jessica Shaw says they are looking to the community for some direction on what they should focus on.“If we want people to actually implement some of these practices to use water efficiently, it has to be something they want to do or that they think is feasible. That’s where we really appreciate people letting us know that, ‘Yeah, I think I can be more efficient in watering my lawn, or no I’d rather look at more efficient ways to use water in the house.’”Shaw says every little bit matters.“People sometimes think, ‘Well, so what if I just let my sprinklers run and the yard is a little soggy,’ but if everybody thinks that way all of a sudden we’re using a lot more water than what we really need and at some point in the future we’re going to have to consider how do we get more water and that can be very expensive.”Shaw says Wenatchee residents use more water than the average American. A public meeting on water use efficiency goals will be held at Pybus, August 29th from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. You can also provide feedback online at the city’s website.last_img read more

Study examines link between nicotine dependence and likelihood to quit smoking after

first_img Source:http://www.chestnet.org/News/Press-Releases/2018/05/Tobacco May 22 2018Tobacco cessation is considered the single most effective primary prevention strategy for reducing the risk of lung cancer death in patients. Having a better understanding of smokers and their characteristics can help to better identify their downstream outcomes, determine predictors of continued smoking and develop a personalized treatment plan. A new study in the May edition of the journal CHEST® investigated the relationship between the degree of nicotine dependence and the likelihood to quit smoking and clinical cancer and mortality outcomes in a cohort of screened patients. The study found that patients with a higher nicotine dependence are less likely to quit post-lung cancer screening.Researchers from the Medical University of South Carolina conducted a secondary research analysis on the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), which included 53,452 current and former (ie, quit within 15 years) smokers between the ages of 55-74 with a minimum of a 30 pack-year cigarette smoking history. Participants were randomized into three rounds of annual screening with either low-dose computed tomography or chest radiography to check for lung cancer.Related StoriesHow cell-free DNA can be targeted to prevent spread of tumorsUsing machine learning algorithm to accurately diagnose breast cancerResearchers use AI to develop early gastric cancer endoscopic diagnosis systemThe study first analyzed a subset of 14,125 participants who filled out a more detailed smoking history questionnaire than the other participants. Researchers also aimed to focus on how current nicotine dependence related to medical outcomes in a subset of 7,056 current smokers. To evaluate tobacco dependence within patients, researchers utilized the Fagerstrӧm Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND).”The Fagerstrӧm Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND) is a six-item self-report scale commonly used for the measurement of severity of dependence on cigarettes. It has been recently shown that assessing nicotine dependence with time to first cigarette (TTFC) can help to classify lung cancer screening patients with regard to their lung cancer risk, which may be helpful in shared decision-making visits and establishing better risk-predictive eligibility criteria for screening,” Alana Rojewski, lead author explained.In this study, the researchers found that current smokers have varying levels of tobacco dependence that can help predict a person’s ability to quit and clinical outcomes. A single question within this screening tool, TTFC, was associated with outcomes in this population. Specifically, those who had their first cigarette within 5 minutes of waking were significantly less likely to be successful in smoking cessation, significantly more likely to have lung cancer and had significantly higher rates of death.”Given the extensive smoking histories of lung-screening patients and their risk for poor clinical outcomes, utilizing this information can help to develop tailored tobacco treatment plans,” Dr. Rojewski added. “We have an opportunity to improve risk assessment for lung cancer, which may lead to better individual and health system outcomes in the future.”last_img read more

Increasing number of women learn about breast cancer diagnosis over the telephone

first_img Source:https://missouri.edu/ Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Sep 11 2018A new study from the University of Missouri School of Medicine reveals an increasing number of women are learning about their breast cancer diagnosis over the phone. It’s a finding that has prompted the MU School of Medicine to develop new training methods to better prepare future physicians to deliver negative news without being face-to-face with patients.Researchers surveyed nearly 2,900 breast cancer patients who were diagnosed between 1967 and 2017. The research revealed prior to 2007, about 25 percent of patients learned of their diagnosis over the telephone. After 2007, that number increased to more than 50 percent. Since 2015, that number has grown to 60 percent.”When we analyzed the data, I was completely surprised to find such a clear trend,” said Jane McElroy, PhD, professor of family and community medicine at the MU School of Medicine and lead author of the study. “Historically, physicians have decided to use their best judgment when delivering a diagnosis, whether it’s in person or over the phone. Nowadays, some patients clearly want to hear this information over the phone.”Related StoriesTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerLiving with advanced breast cancerNew study to ease plight of patients with advanced cancerTalking with patients in person about a serious illness or disease is considered best practice at hospitals and medical schools across the country, including at MU Health Care. However, McElroy’s research has prompted changes to the MU School of Medicine’s curriculum for medical students.”We are now including additional training for first-year medical students to talk about situations and techniques for breaking bad news over the phone,” said Natalie Long, MD, assistant professor of clinical family and community medicine at the MU School of Medicine. Long was not directly involved with the study but adjusted the curriculum after talking with McElroy about the study findings. “The digital age has changed our perception of how we want to get news. I think younger patients just want to know news faster.”Many of the same principals taught for delivering bad news in person can be applied to phone conversations, according to Long. The key is learning beforehand how the patient wishes to be informed. Best practices include making sure the patient is in a good place to talk, using good listening skills, showing empathy, ensuring the patient has a support system around them and developing a follow-up plan.”Anytime you break bad news, patients only hear a fraction of what you tell them,” Long said. “So, that’s where the follow up is really important.””This patient-centered approach to notification shows we are leading the next generation of physicians,” McElroy said “When we looked at how other hospitals are confronting this dilemma, we realized we’re on the forefront of this discussion by training our medical students before they have to deliver difficult diagnoses as physicians.”last_img read more

Top stories A sixth sense quantum teleportation and horses that use symbols

first_imgSome researchers have posited that the ancestors of the Australian Aborigines were the first modern humans to surge out of Africa, spreading swiftly eastward along the coasts of southern Asia thousands of years before a second wave of migrants populated Eurasia. Not so, according to a trio of genomic studies, the first to analyze many full genomes from Australia and New Guinea. They conclude that, like most other living Eurasians, Aborigines descend from a single group of modern humans who swept out of Africa 50,000 to 60,000 years ago.Big step for quantum teleportation won’t bring us any closer to Star Trek. Here’s whyTwo teams have set a new distance record for quantum teleportation: using the weirdness of quantum mechanics to instantly transfer the condition or “state” of one quantum particle to another one in a different location. This advance could eventually lead to an unhackable quantum internet. But what else is quantum teleportation good for? And will we ever be able to use it to zip painlessly to work on a frigid January morning?Horses can use symbols to ‘talk’ to usThere will never be a horse like Mr. Ed, the talking equine TV star. But scientists have discovered that the animals can learn to use another human tool for communicating: pointing to symbols. They join a short list of other species, including some primates, dolphins, and pigeons, with this talent. The study’s strong results show that the horses understand the consequences of their choices, say the scientists, who hope that other researchers will use their method to ask horses more questions.University of Tokyo to investigate data manipulation charges against six prominent research groupsThe University of Tokyo announced it is launching an investigation into anonymously made claims of fabricated and falsified data appearing in 22 papers by six university research groups. An individual or group going by the name “Ordinary_researchers” detailed questions about data and graphs in more than 100 pages delivered to the university in two batches on 14 and 29 August. This announcement of a full probe came after the university conducted a preliminary investigation.Now that you’ve got the scoop on this week’s hottest Science news, come back Monday to test your smarts on our weekly quiz! Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Researchers discover gene behind ‘sixth sense’ in humansA soft brush that feels like prickly thorns. A vibrating tuning fork that produces no vibration. Not being able to tell which direction body joints are moving without looking at them. Those are some of the bizarre sensations reported by a 9-year-old girl and 19-year-old woman in a new study. The duo, researchers say, shares an extremely rare genetic mutation that may shed light on a so-called “sixth sense” in humans: proprioception, or the body’s awareness of where it is in space. The new work may even explain why some of us are more klutzy than others.Almost all living people outside of Africa trace back to a single migration more than 50,000 years agocenter_img Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

Promiscuous mice have a gene for faster sperm

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img The deer mouse is the Don Juan of rodents. Unlike its monogamous cousin, the oldfield mouse, it’s into orgies, and females often rear litters fathered by more than one partner. Now, a comparison of the sperm of these two closely related species has revealed another difference between them: a gene that makes the deer mouse sperm faster and more virile. The secret has to do with an expanded midsection in the sperm’s tail that propels the male mouse’s semen-laden package through the female reproductive tract. “We are beginning to unravel the genetic architecture of sperm design and function,” says Tim Birkhead, a behavioral ecologist at the University of Sheffield in the United Kingdom who was not involved with the work. Researchers already know that sperm motility—or quality—is an important factor in human fertility, but what genes are involved and how has been a mystery. Thus, the mouse study may shed light even on the genetic basis to human fertility, Birkhead says.To track the genetic basis of fertility, Harvard University evolutionary biologist Hopi Hoekstra and her colleagues turned to the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) and the oldfield mouse (P. polionotus). They are so closely related that they can interbreed, yet they have very different mating strategies. In deer mouse orgies, both sexes mate with different partners, sometimes switching to a new one every few minutes, whereas oldfield mice are faithful to their first loves. “To have two closely related species with such different mating systems is an evolutionary biologist’s dream,” Birkhead says. Hoekstra and her team first examined the two species’ sperm under a microscope. The deer mouse sperm could swim much faster, thanks to tails with expanded midsections. These so-called midpieces are packed full of the mitochondria that fuel the sperm’s swim. To pin down the genetic basis of this difference, the researchers then mated the offspring of hybrid mice and measured the midpiece length of their descendants and the speediness of their sperm. Their studies led them to a gene called PrKar1a.The protein coded for by PrKar1a is abundant in the tail’s midpiece, suggesting the protein plays an important role in midpiece function. And sure enough, there were differences in the amount of the protein in the oldfield and deer mouse midpieces, Hoekstra and her team reported late last month on the biology preprint server bioRxiv. When the team then bred lab mice with just one copy of PrKar1a, which has also been implicated in male fertility in humans, male mice had sperm with shorter midpieces, leading the researchers to conclude that competition among deer mice sperm has driven that species to have a different level of PrKar1a gene activity, and consequently faster, more competitive sperm.These results speak to how behavior itself can drive evolution through different mating strategies. When competition is stiff, as is the case among deer mice, expanded midpieces provide an advantage. But, now that there is a specific gene tied to sperm speed, it also hints at a possible genetic influence on male fertility in humans.last_img read more

This simple plastic mask makes ultrasound easy

first_img If you’ve welcomed a new baby into the world in the past few years, chances are you’ve also had a brush with 3D ultrasound: a noninvasive technique that uses sound to image soft tissue, internal organs, and—yes—even babies in three dimensions. But this relatively new technology has its drawbacks. Because ultrasound relies on tiny, low-volume echoes, most 3D imaging devices require thousands of sensors to generate a detailed picture. Now, engineers have developed a new system that cuts this number down to just one, they report today in Science Advances. They did so using compressive sensing, a technique that extrapolates information from one data source into many different points using some pretty complicated math. Engineers place an irregularly shaped piece of plastic, with small dots of varying heights on the surface, over the sensor. When the high-frequency sound waves emitted by the sensor pass through the plastic, this so-called “coded aperture mask” introduces small delays into the audio. When the sound bounces back to the sensor, it is then run through a computer algorithm that picks out the delays and represents them as individual pixels. Because the dots are randomly distributed across the surface of the cover, rotating the mask allows more measurements to be performed, and helps resolve the image in higher detail. The researchers tested their device by submerging two 3D-printed plastic letters in a small tank of water. When they activated the ultrasound sensor, it was able to pick the letters out of the data and pinpoint their location in 3D space. This simple plastic mask makes ultrasound easy By Andrew WagnerDec. 8, 2017 , 2:00 PMlast_img read more

BUSINESS BYTE CW Communications – Preparations in place for 2019 hurricane season

first_imgShareTweetSharePinC&W Communications CEO Inge SmidtsInge Smidts, CEO of C&W Communications (C&W) operator of the consumer brands Flow and BTC, and the C&W Business brand in the Caribbean, has issued a call for all families and businesses to be fully prepared as another Atlantic Hurricane season kicked off on June 1st, 2019.  The season got an early start this year as Hurricane Andrea, a low-powered storm, formed on May 20th some 300 miles west-southwest of Bermuda. Though the storm made no landfall it brought sharply into focus the need for the Caribbean region to once again prepare for what the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is calling a “fairly normal” Hurricane Season.  NOAA is predicting 9 to 15 named storms with possibly 2 to 4 storms becoming major hurricanes this year.C&W has been actively preparing for the 2019 Hurricane season and has already completed a series of rigorous hurricane drills across its markets and has begun customer awareness campaigns encouraging everyone to be on alert and ready to take the necessary steps to protect their families, and property.Following 2017’s disastrous hurricanes across the central and northern Caribbean, C&W invested approximately US$50M in Hurricane Restoration across its Caribbean operations.  Some of this funding went towards upgrading cellular towers in impacted markets to higher category-rated models built specifically to withstand more extreme wind conditions.  Additionally, the company’s world-class subsea network remains one of the most secure subsea cable systems in this hemisphere with increased redundancy added by building our alternative routes for data and mobile traffic, in the event of an emergency.CEO Smidts said, “While we are hopeful that no customers will be impacted during this year’s hurricane season, we must also ensure that we are ready to face that reality if it comes.  We are enormously proud of how our network performed in the hurricane-impacted islands in 2017, and we know that our customers were relieved that they could have access to family and friends during that time.  We have invested in strengthening our networks, whether through new and improved technology or ensuring we have alternate ways to back up our data and mobile traffic in case any part of our network is compromised.  I urge families to take a moment to formulate their own Hurricane safety plan, check with your local disaster preparedness office or online for easy to use templates, and decide now what you will do as a family in the event of a Hurricane. Keep this plan handy with your emergency supplies and of course, your Flow and BTC handset.”According to Smidts, “Nothing beats preparation.  It must be a priority for everyone including regional governments and organizations like ours. We at C&W continue to hold true to our commitment to keep our customers connected to family and friends especially during the moments that matters most, such as during times of disaster.”last_img read more

Churches in Poland are providing sanctuary—to birds

first_img Email The numbers mean churches may be important for maintaining bird diversity in Poland, which is home to more than 10,000 churches, the authors say. They even suggest ecominded pastors could boost conservation efforts by preserving structures attractive to birds, including building nooks and bell towers. By Joshua Rapp LearnOct. 26, 2018 , 2:55 PM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Most churches are focused on heaven, but in Poland, they seem to be providing a more earthly benefit: sanctuary for dozens of species of birds.That’s what biologists found when they surveyed the properties of 101 churches and an equal number of farmsteads in villages in southern Poland. Previous research had found that farms in Eastern Europe support large numbers of different kinds of birds, providing important sanctuaries for the species in areas where their more natural habitat was lost. But the new study, which examined the features of in-use churches and farms, as well as their surrounding grounds, shows churches had 1.6 times more species on average than farms, and about twice as many birds overall, the researchers report this month in Biological Conservation.Tall, old churches with separate bell towers hosted the highest bird diversity. That may be because they mimic the isolated, rocky hills that abound in the Polish landscape, the authors say. Another reason: Birds have had centuries to incorporate the oldest of the churches into their habitats. Finally, there were fewer cats—which are notorious bird predators—at most of the surveyed churches. Churches in Poland are providing sanctuary—to birds Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Jacek Sopotnicki/Alamy Stock Photo last_img read more

Survey Complementary and alternative medicine is widely used by general population in

first_imgThis survey shows that CAM is widely used by the general population, especially for musculoskeletal and mental health problems, with a slight increase in use since 2005. Access, however, is unequal and most people who see a CAM practitioner are better off and pay for it themselves. We also asked about people’s willingness to pay for CAM and found, unsurprisingly, that it seemed to be based on ability to pay. However, 13 per cent of non-CAM users said they would be willing to part-pay if the NHS or other organizations paid the rest.”Dr Ava Lorenc, co-author from the Centre for Academic Primary Care, added: Current UK health policy advocates patient-centered care and has a focus on prevention and patient self-management. Greater integration of CAM services into NHS primary care could address the inequality in access that we found, for example, through social prescribing. This survey was part of a wider scoping study for a trial to test the effectiveness of CAM for people with both musculoskeletal and mental health problems, which we hope will add to the evidence-base for CAM.” Source:http://www.bristol.ac.uk/news/2018/november/complementary-alternative-medicine-.htmlcenter_img Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 14 2018Use of practitioner-led complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), such as acupuncture, massage, osteopathy and chiropractic treatment, rose from 12 per cent of the population in 2005 to 16 per cent of the population in 2015, according to a survey led by researchers at the University of Bristol’s Centre for Academic Primary Care. However, access to these treatments was unequal, with women, those who are better off and those in the south of England more likely to use CAM.The survey, funded by the National Institute for Health Research, undertaken by Ipsos MORI and published in BJGP Open today [14 November], asked adults in England about their CAM use in the last 12 months. Out of a representative sample of 4,862 respondents aged 15 and over, 766 (16 per cent) said they had seen a CAM practitioner.More women than men and more people in higher socioeconomic groups (A-C) than in lower socioeconomic groups (D-E) used CAM. CAM use was almost twice as high in the south of England compared with the North and Midlands.The majority of CAM users either paid for treatment themselves or had it paid for by friends or family (67 per cent). Most CAM users self-referred (either found the practitioners themselves or through a recommendation from a friend or family) (70 per cent). A small proportion were referred by their GP (17 per cent) or other health professional (four per cent) and more of these were from lower socioeconomic groups.The main reasons for CAM use were for musculoskeletal problems, particularly back pain (38 per cent), and other musculoskeletal pain (neck pain, shoulder pain or knee pain) (22 per cent). Mental health accounted for 12 per cent of CAM use, including for minor depression, anxiety or stress (seven per cent) and sleep problems, tiredness or fatigue (four per cent).CAM use was fairly evenly spread across all age groups.Professor Debbie Sharp, from the Centre for Academic Primary Care and lead author of the study, said:last_img read more

Worlds first robotassisted bilateral breast reconstruction performed by Penn surgeons

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Dec 6 2018A team of surgeons from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania are the first in the world to use a surgical robot to assist with a bilateral free flap breast reconstruction – a procedure in which tissue is taken from the lower abdomen – similar to a “tummy tuck” – and used to rebuild the breast. The robot allows surgeons to make a much smaller incision into the abdominal wall muscles, allowing patients to recover and be discharged more quickly and without the use of addictive narcotic painkillers. Suhail Kanchwala, MD, an associate professor of Plastic Surgery, led the team that performed the procedure, which took place at Pennsylvania Hospital earlier this month. Kanchwala partnered with Ian Soriano, MD, FCAS, a clinical assistant professor of Surgery, who specializes in minimally invasive procedures, to develop the technique.”We’ve been using a minimally-invasive, laparoscopic technique to reduce pain and get patients home more quickly without using narcotics for more than a year. The addition of the surgical robot allows for greater precision and is the next step in our evolution,” Kanchwala said. Women who have chosen a mastectomy, either to remove cancerous breast tissue or as preventative measure due to genetic risk, have several options for reconstruction. Traditionally, using a patients’ own tissue results in a more natural appearance and is a more permanent solution when compared to implant-based reconstructions, which often require additional surgeries. Penn surgeons perform more than 700 tissue-based reconstructions yearly, making it the largest center for this form of reconstruction in the world.”Our experience is what allows us to innovate, and adapting minimally invasive approaches to breast reconstruction allows patients to have the same recovery of implant reconstruction without the downsides of having an implant, such as the risk of infection or the need for further surgery,” Kanchwala said.Related StoriesStudy analyzes high capacity of A. baumannii to persist on various surfacesBariatric surgery should be offered to all patients who would benefitTen-fold rise in tongue-tie surgery for newborns ‘without any real strong data’The minimally invasive flap procedure virtually eliminates the need to cut into a patient’s abdominal muscles to remove the skin and fat of the lower abdomen to use in the reconstruction of the breast. That incision in the muscle is the main source of pain and other potential complications. Kanchwala called the laparoscopic technique, which he has now used in more than 120 cases, “game changing.” He also notes that in 70 percent of those cases, his patients did not require any narcotics, even while under anesthesia. Instead, patients receive over-the-counter medicine like Motrin or Tylenol for pain.”Many of these patients wake up as if they haven’t had a surgery, and we’ve seen patients who would normally be in the hospital for five days go home in just one or two days,” Kanchwala said.Much like with the laparoscopic technique, the surgical robot allows the surgeon to avoid larger cuts to the muscle while also collecting blood vessels more easily. The smaller incision also limits the risk of hernia and other complications.Pain management is another unique aspect of this technique. Research has shown that one out of every 20 breast reconstruction patients who have never had a narcotic before their surgeries are still on those narcotics five years later. Kanchwala says this technique addresses this reality head-on, and it requires a team approach. All patients are enrolled in a coordinated Enhanced Recovery Protocol which means from the minute they enter the hospital the focus is on their recovery and getting them back to normal as fast as possible.”We’ve paired our surgical innovations with similar progressive ideas in anesthesia and postoperative care,” Kanchwala said. “Nothing I do now is the same as it was even a year ago, and knowing what I now know, I could never go back.”Source: https://www.pennmedicine.org/news/news-releases/2018/december/penn-medicine-plastic-surgeons-perform-worlds-first-robotic-bilateral-breast-reconstructionlast_img read more

Antimicrobial reusable coffee cups are less likely to become contaminated with bacteria

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Feb 19 2019Antimicrobial reusable coffee cups are safer to use than ordinary plastic reusable cups, according to independent research undertaken by microbiologists at Aston University in Birmingham.The researchers who compared ordinary plastic coffee cups to specially developed antimicrobial cups, found the antimicrobial technology inhibited the growth of most common types of bacteria by more than 99%. The reduction in residual bacteria was found on the external and internal lid and on the inside of the cup.The findings are significant as the popularity of reusable cups has rocketed in recent years, in anticipation that the government could impose a “latte tax” on disposable cups. Major coffee chains have also started offering special discounts on drinks to incentivise the use of reusables.However, independent studies by Aston University and Public Health England have shown that reusable cups are a breeding ground for dangerous bacteria if they’re not cleaned properly. The problem is worse in hot drinks containers where dairy and sugar are present, providing the perfect food source for bacteria.The scientists measured the bacterial loading recovered from eight ordinary reusable coffee cups that had been subjected to daily use and a variety of cleaning regimes, then compared them with coffee cups containing Biomaster antimicrobial technology to see if they could find a reduction in the levels of surface bacteria in the treated cup.A range of usage profiles were investigated with samples from each tested over a period of five days: One coffee per day, washing the cup in hot water with detergent after use, with the cup left to dry naturally; One coffee per day, rinsing the cup under running cold water after use, with the cup left to dry naturally; One coffee per day, no cleaning of cup in between use. Coffee finished and left to dry naturally. One coffee per day, leaving 20ml of unconsumed coffee in the bottom of the cup which remained until next use, when the cup was emptied and rinsed with cold water prior to refill. Source:https://www2.aston.ac.uk/center_img Related StoriesAnalysis: A health care overhaul could kill 2 million jobs, and that’s OKStudy shows how fine motor tasks promote plastic reorganization of certain brain regionResearchers examine how coffee helps bowel movementThe antimicrobial technology was found to deliver the most effective reduction in the residual level of bacteria on the external and internal lid and internal surfaces of the cup.The standard cups were found to still contain a very high residual bacterial load across all samples tested, even after the cleaning regime had been completed.Anthony Hilton, Professor of Applied Microbiology, Aston University said: “Bacteria can easily grow on the inner surfaces of a reusable coffee cup unless it is washed after use. Antimicrobial technology built into the drinking vessel significantly reduces the opportunity for bacteria to grow.”Our study shows that reusable coffee cups treated with antimicrobial technology are much less likely to become heavily contaminated with bacteria.”The antimicrobial material is based on silver technology and has three modes of action. When micro-organisms come into contact with the antimicrobial material, the silver ions prevent them from growing, producing energy or replicating; thus causing them to die.last_img read more

Link between dietary fatty acid intake and hypertension found to be influenced

first_img Source:https://www.kanazawa-u.ac.jp/latest-research/64777 Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Feb 20 2019Kanazawa University-led study shows that routine dietary intake of n-6 fatty acids may be beneficial for hypertension control in healthy individuals, but may increase risk of hypertension in patients with diabetesHypertension is an important public health problem that can lead to life-threatening cardiovascular events, including heart attack and stroke. Many studies have attempted to understand the complex relationship between dietary factors and hypertension; none have provided a clear explanation of the interaction between hypertension and dietary intake of n-6 fatty acids (a building block of fat), until now.In a new study published in Nutrients, a research team from Kanazawa University investigated the relationship between dietary intake of n-6 fatty acids and hypertension, using blood pressure measurement and a diet history questionnaire, and found that the relationship between dietary intake of n-6 fatty acids and hypertension was influenced by diabetes status.”There have been conflicting reports of the relationship between dietary intake of n-6 fatty acids and risk of hypertension,” says Hiroyuki Nakamura, corresponding author on the study. “Metabolites of n-6 fatty acids can lower blood pressure in a manner influenced by blood glucose levels. Therefore, we suspected that the relationship between dietary intake of n-6 fatty acids and risk of hypertension might be affected by glucose tolerance, which is impaired in patients with diabetes.”In the study, the researchers found that the relationship between dietary intake of n-6 fatty acids and hypertension differed according to whether subjects had diabetes; in healthy subjects, high intake of n-6 fatty acids was significantly associated with hypertension, whereas high intake of n-6 fatty acids was inversely associated with hypertension in subjects with diabetes.Related StoriesMetformin use linked to lower risk of dementia in African Americans with type 2 diabetesObese patients with Type 1 diabetes could safely receive robotic pancreas transplantDiet and nutrition influence microbiome in colonic mucosa”Our analyses revealed a relationship between dietary intake of n-6 fatty acids and glycated hemoglobin in the blood (our definition of diabetes), which has not been previously established,” says Haruki Nakamura, lead author on the study. “A previous meta-analysis showed that higher intake of a diet rich in linoleic acid (the main fatty acid in the n-6 fatty acids class) was significantly associated with higher risks of death from all causes, cardiovascular disease, and coronary heart disease in subjects with cardiovascular disease. Therefore, our results indicate that n-6 fatty acid intake may have no cardiovascular benefit in subjects who are at risk for cardiovascular disease or diabetes.”In addition to the reduction of hypertension associated with increased dietary intake of n-6 fatty acids by healthy individuals, the researchers showed no benefit, and possible hypertension-related harm, from increased dietary intake of n-6 fatty acids by patients with diabetes.Hypertension is an important risk factor for a variety of destructive cardiovascular injuries. This study showed that increased dietary intake of n-6 fatty acids could positively impact the risk of hypertension, but that this benefit is limited to individuals who do not have impaired glucose tolerance.last_img read more

FDA grants accelerated approval to new treatment for refractory multiple myeloma

first_imgMultiple myeloma is cancer that begins in plasma cells (white blood cells that produce antibodies) and may also be referred to as plasma cell myeloma. Abnormal plasma cells build up in the bone marrow, forming tumors in many bones of the body. As more antibodies are made, it can cause blood to thicken and keep the bone marrow from making enough healthy blood cells. The exact causes of multiple myeloma are unknown, but it is more common in older people and African Americans.Efficacy was evaluated in 83 patients with RRMM who were treated with Xpovio in combination with dexamethasone. At the end of the study, the overall response rate was measured at 25.3%. The median time to first response was four weeks, with a range of one to ten weeks. The median duration of response was 3.8 months. The efficacy evaluation was supported by additional information from an ongoing, randomized trial in patients with multiple myeloma.Related StoriesNew gene-editing protocol allows perfect mutation-effect matchingSugary drinks linked to cancer finds studyNanoparticles used to deliver CRISPR gene editing tools into the cellCommon side effects of patients taking Xpovio in combination with dexamethasone include a low white blood cell count (leukopenia), a low count of neutrophils, a type of white blood cell (neutropenia), low count of platelets (thrombocytopenia) and low amount of red blood cells (anemia). Patients also reported vomiting, nausea, fatigue, diarrhea, fever, decreased appetite and weight, constipation, upper respiratory tract infections and low blood sodium levels (hyponatremia).Health care professionals are advised to monitor patients for low blood counts, platelets and sodium levels. Patients should avoid taking Xpovio with other medications that may cause dizziness or confusion and avoid situations where dizziness may be a problem. Health care professionals are advised to optimize the patient’s hydration status, blood counts and other medications to avoid dizziness or confusion.The FDA advises health care professionals to tell females of reproductive age and males with a female partner of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with Xpovio. Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding should not take Xpovio because it may cause harm to a developing fetus or newborn baby. Xpovio must be dispensed with a patient Medication Guide that describes important information about the drug’s uses and risks.Xpovio in combination with dexamethasone was granted accelerated approval, which enables the FDA to approve drugs for serious conditions to fill an unmet medical need based on an endpoint that is reasonably likely to predict a clinical benefit to patients. Further clinical trials are required to verify and describe Xpovio’s clinical benefit.The FDA granted this application Fast Track designation. Xpovio also received Orphan Drug designation, which provides incentives to assist and encourage the development of drugs for rare diseases. The FDA granted the approval of Xpovio to Karyopharm Therapeutics. Source:U.S. Food and Drug Administration While there is no cure for multiple myeloma, there are FDA-approved treatments to target the cancer and slow down the spread of the disease. Sadly, often over time, patients can exhaust all available treatments and still see their disease progress. Today we approved a treatment under our accelerated approval program that provides a treatment option for patients with multiple myeloma with no available therapy.”Richard Pazdur, M.D., director of the FDA’s Oncology Center of Excellence and acting director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Jul 3 2019Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration granted accelerated approval to Xpovio (selinexor) tablets in combination with the corticosteroid dexamethasone for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM) who have received at least four prior therapies and whose disease is resistant to several other forms of treatment, including at least two proteasome inhibitors, at least two immunomodulatory agents, and an anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody.last_img read more

Research examines wing shapes to reduce vortex and wake

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign What’s not always visible is a vortex coming off of the tip of each wing—like two tiny horizontal tornadoes—leaving behind a turbulent wake behind the vehicle. The wake poses a destabilizing flight hazard, particularly for smaller aircraft that share the same flight path.Recent research at the University of Illinois demonstrated that, although most wing shapes used today create these turbulent wake vortices, wing geometrics can be designed to reduce or eliminate wingtip vortices almost entirely. In the study, the vortex and wake characteristics were computed for three classic wing designs: the elliptic wing, and wing designs developed in classic studies by R.T. Jones and Ludwig Prandt.”The elliptic wing configuration has been used as the gold standard of aerodynamic efficiency for the better part of a century. We teach our students that it has the optimal loading characteristics and that it’s often used when looking at wing efficiency for say, minimizing drag,” said Phillip Ansell, assistant professor in the Department of Aerospace Engineering at U of I.In a previous experimental study on optimizing wing configurations, Ansell learned you can gain efficiency of the wing system with a non-elliptic wing profile. “Previous academic studies have shown that, theoretically, there are other designs that actually provide lower drag of a planar wing for a fixed amount of lift generation. But what has been missing is an actual apples-to-apples experiment to prove it.”In this new research, Ansell, and his graduate student, Prateek Ranjan, used the real data from the previous study to analyze the three wing configurations.”We chased this down because we saw something curious in our measurements in the earlier experiment. Consequently, in this new study, we simulated the flow about these three wings and saw significant differences in how the vortices and wakes developed from each of the three wing types. The Jones and the Prandtl wing configurations didn’t have wing-tip vortices like the elliptic wing. They had a much more gradual bulk deformation of the whole wake structure, rather than an immediate coherent roll-up. We now know that we can delay the formation of wake vortex structures, and increase the distance it takes a trailing wake vortex to roll up by about 12 times, making it weaker and less of a hazard to the aircraft entering its wake.” Explore further It’s common to see line-shaped clouds in the sky, known as contrails, trailing behind the engines of a jet airplane. More information: Prateek Ranjan et al, Computational Analysis of Vortex Wakes Without Near-Field Rollup Characteristics, Journal of Aircraft (2018). DOI: 10.2514/1.C034782 Photo showing wake turbulence. Credit: Ryoh Ishihara Ansell said this information can be used to re-tailor how formation flight is viewed between aircraft, or to develop a new an ideal configuration for the lift loading for takeoffs and landings, and subsequently reduce the length of separation between aircraft in the same flight path.”Trailing wingtip vortices tend to take a long time to go away once they form in the atmosphere. So the time it takes for the vortex to dissipate has to be figured into the takeoff time of the next aircraft going in that same path. The motion of the air produced by these vortices can create a hazard for trailing aircraft, as it can be unpredictable and make for dangerous flight regimes. So using the Jones or Prandtl wings would result in much less turbulent air behind a plane,” Ansell said.You’d think that Ansell’s conclusion is to use only the Jones or Prandtl wing configurations, but it’s not.”One of the things that first drew me to the topic of aerodynamics is that the right answer always depends on what your constraints are. If you’re building a tiny unmanned vehicle that will fly at a low speed, you’ll get a different solution for design needs than if you’re building an aircraft that will carry people at high altitudes and high speeds. So technically, you could argue that all three wing types are the best solution. The question is, what are your driving constraints, such as wing span and weight, behind selecting one of them?”Ansell added that this is a basic research study and not intended to advise a specific aircraft designer or company.”We are looking at how the wing flow behaves and the information can be used to understand how the roll-up process of vortices is produced. This study allows us to be aware of how the wing configuration affects the trailing vortex formation and wake by studying the extreme bounds of immediate and delayed vortex roll-up processes,” Ansell said.”Interestingly we identified that one of the worst offenders of creating vortices is indeed the elliptic lift distribution, which is also among the most conventional wing design. It has definitely changed the way I talk about the issue in my classes. Instead of simply referring to the flow patterns produced behind the wing as a pair of ‘wingtip vortices,’ I’ve taken to describe the full wake produced as the trailing vortex system.”The paper, “Computational Analysis of Vortex Wakes Without Near-Field Rollup Characteristics,” was co-authored by Prateek Ranjan and Phillip J. Ansell. It appears in the Journal of Aircraft. Citation: Research examines wing shapes to reduce vortex and wake (2018, May 14) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-05-wing-vortex.html Jackdaws flap their wings to save energy read more

Dating apps use artificial intelligence to help search for love

first_img The use of artificial intelligence was highlighted at the four-day Web Summit in Lisbon Forget swiping though endless profiles. Dating apps are using artificial intelligence to suggest where to go on a first date, recommend what to say and even find a partner who looks like your favourite celebrity. Tinder founder Sean Rad told the Web Summit in Lisbon that AI will “create better user experiences” Citation: Dating apps use artificial intelligence to help search for love (2018, November 8) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-11-dating-apps-artificial-intelligence.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres told the Web Summit that he was “very happy I have chosen my soulmate by traditional methods” © 2018 AFP After the date, the app checks in with both people to see how it went and recommend whether they should continue to see each other or keep looking.Teman hopes to make it available across the United States early next year.Celebrity lookalikesBadoo, a London-based dating app, is now using AI and facial recognition technology to let users find a match that looks like anyone at all, including their ex or celebrity crush.Users can upload a picture of someone and the app will find lookalikes among Badoo’s more than 400 million users worldwide.Reality TV star Kim Kardashian, Oscar-winning actress Emma Stone and singer Beyonce are the most searched for celebrities globally since Badoo introduced the feature—dubbed Lookalikes—last year.However not everyone is convinced that AI can aid the search for love. Among the doubters at the Web Summit was UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, who said he was “a little bit sceptical” it could help “people chose their soul mates”.”I’m very happy I have chosen my soulmate by traditional methods,” said the former Portuguese prime minister, who is married to a Lisbon city councillor, in his opening address to the gathering on Monday. Explore further Using Tinder doesn’t result in more casual sex Until recently smartphone dating apps—such as Tinder which lets you see in real time who is available and “swipe” if you wish to meet someone—left it up to users to ask someone out and then make the date go well.But to fight growing fatigue from searching through profiles in vain, the online dating sector is turning to artificial intelligence (AI) to help arrange meetings in real life and act as a dating coach.These new uses for AI—the science of programming computers to reproduce human processes like thinking and decision making—by dating apps were highlighted at the four-day Web Summit which wraps up Thursday in Lisbon.Online dating pioneer eHarmony announced it is developing an AI-enabled feature which nudges users to suggest meeting in person after they have been chatting in the app for a while.”There is a lot of activity on dating apps but by and large there is not a lot of dates,” eHarmony CEO Grant Langston told the annual tech gathering.”Guys don’t know how to ask, it’s astounding really how many people need help and we think we can do that in an automated way.”‘Takes pressure off’British dating app Loveflutter plans to use AI to analyse chats between its users to determine their compatibility and suggest when they should meet.”We will ping a message saying ‘You are getting along really well, why don’t you go on your first date’,” said Loveflutter co-founder Daigo Smith. When you open the app, a soothing voice asks questions about what you like to do on a date or where you would like to travel.It then suggests suitable matches based on your personality. Once you have picked one you would like to meet, the app tells you about them.After several days the app will help set up a time for a phone call between you and your match—and give advice for your first date based on what it knows about the other person.”It will say things like ‘based on her personality inclination she is a traditional person, I would recommend dinner and a walk’,” said Kevin Teman, the app’s developer.The app also reminds you to ask questions “about the things that are important to you” during the date, he added. Loveflutter already suggests places to go on a first date that are equidistant from both people’s homes using information from Foursquare, an app that helps smartphone users find nearby restaurants, bars and clubs.”It kind of takes the pressure off organising that first date,” said Smith.Tinder founder Sean Rad said AI will “create better user experiences” and predicted iPhone’s Siri Voice assistant would in the future act as a matchmaker.Voice activatedAn entirely voice operated dating app called AIMM which uses AI to mirror a human matchmaking service is already being tested in Denver where it has about 1,000 users.last_img read more

Ford to cut jobs in European revamp

first_img The new strategy is aimed at cutting structural costs and redesigning the product lineup for commercial vehicles, passenger vehicles and imports, it said.”We are taking decisive action to transform the Ford business in Europe,” Steven Armstrong, group vice president and president for Europe, Middle East and Africa said in a statement.Ford did not specify the number of projected job cuts, but said it hoped to achieve them through voluntary redundancies.”Structural cost improvements will be supported by reduction of surplus labour across all functions –- salaried and hourly,” it said.Among concrete steps in key markets Ford said it will end production of small automatic transmissions in Bordeaux, France.In Germany, it plans to end production of the C-Max and Grand C-Max in Saarlouis in response to a shrinking market in Europe for compact multi-purpose vehicles.In Russia, Ford said it will launch a strategic review of its joint venture Ford Sollers, with several restructuring options on the table.Ford also plans to consolidate its UK headquarters and Ford Credit Europe’s headquarters at the Ford Dunton Technical Center in South East Essex.Ford employs around 53,000 people at its wholly-owned facilities in Europe—over a quarter of its worldwide total.The company has been making cars in Europe since 1911. Ford’s profitability has been under pressure in Europe for a while US carmaker Ford said on Thursday that it plans a major restructuring of its European operations, including job cuts, to boost profitability. Citation: Ford to cut jobs in European revamp (2019, January 10) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-01-ford-jobs-european-revamp.html © 2019 AFPcenter_img Explore further Ford to cut global workforce This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Streaming wars heat up as rivals queue up to challenge Netflix

first_imgWolk agreed that Disney “is in a good spot” because of its strong brand and content but predicted that consumers may be overwhelmed by the growing options.”I think there will be a lot of churn,” Wolk said. “People will subscribe to one service to watch one show, and then it becomes easy to cancel and take another.”No panic, yetSome analysts say Netflix has no reason to panic—yet.”Netflix has figured this business out, they know what consumers want,” said Dan Rayburn, a streaming media analyst with Frost & Sullivan.But Rayburn said that over time, rivals may be able to leverage their user base and infrastructure to eat away at Netflix’s advantage.”What does Netflix own? Nothing,” Rayburn said.”If you’re Amazon or AT&T you can give this stuff away and be a loss leader, that’s the big value.”Still, he said any company that wants to challenge Netflix needs to be “quick and nimble” and that it remains to be seen if the legacy players can do that. Explore further Jennifer Aniston is one of the Hollywood stars Apple is counting on as it prepares to launch its streaming video service Strong name recognition and sought-after content is liekly to make Disney a formidable competitor in streaming television Feeling painNetflix is likely to feel pain, not only from the new rivals, but also from the loss of content from the big libraries of Disney and Time Warner.These Hollywood firms “have big libraries, so the cost of their content is much lower than it will be for Netflix, which has to pay for all its content,” said Laura Martin, analyst with the research firm Needham & Co.”Netflix will lose subscribers to these new entrants,” Martin said.AT&T’s WarnerMedia will launch its service later this year that combines the content from its premium HBO channel (known for “Game of Thrones”) and the vast Time Warner library or films and shows. Some of the biggest names in media and tech are gearing up to move into streaming, in what could be a major challenge to market leader Netflix. Richard Greenfield of BTIG Research also questioned the capability of the legacy entertainment firms to compete in the world of new media.”We believe legacy media has missed their window to compete with Netflix (and other tech platforms) unless they are willing to truly go all-in,” Greenfield said in a recent research note.’Innovator’s dilemma’Greenfield said that means moving the focus away from the box office and getting better control of content.”Disney is battling a classic innovator’s dilemma that makes it hard for them to truly pivot to direct-to-consumer, not to mention, they and the rest of legacy media do not really appreciate how important technology is to success in direct-to-consumer streaming,” Greenfield wrote.Daniel Ives of Wedbush Securities said Apple could be the wild card, but that the iPhone maker might need to acquire a content provider like CBS or Sony Pictures to be a major player.Apple “is definitely playing from behind the eight ball in this content arms race with Netflix, Amazon, Disney, Hulu, and AT&T/Time Warner all going after this next consumer frontier,” Ives said in a note to clients.”While acquisitions have not been in Apple’s core DNA, the clock has struck midnight for Cupertino in our opinion and building content organically is a slow and arduous path, which highlights the clear need for Apple to do larger, strategic (deals).” Disney’s service will have its films and TV shows, along with the library it is acquiring from Rupert Murdoch’s 21st Century Fox, a deal closing in the coming days. That includes the “Star Wars” and Marvel superhero franchises and ABC television content.JP Morgan analyst Alexia Quadrani predicts Disney will eventually scale up to become as big as Netflix, or even bigger by signing up 45 million US subscribers and 115 million internationally.Quadrani cited Disney’s “unmatched brand recognition, extensive premium content, and unparalleled ecosystem to market the service.”The analyst said Disney benefits from its global ecosystem that develops good customer relationships from its theme parks, hotels, cruises, and consumer products. Netflix has taken the lead in streaming to expand into 190 markets but is now facing some deep-pocketed rivals including Apple and Disney Apple is expected to make its move with an announcement March 25 on its media plans, with a war chest estimated at some $1 billion and partners including stars like Jennifer Aniston and director J.J. Abrams involved in content.Walt Disney Co. has announced its new streaming service Disney+ will launch this year, as will another from WarnerMedia, the newly acquired media-entertainment division of AT&T.The new entrants, with more expected, could launch a formidable challenge to Netflix, which has some 140 million paid subscribers in 190 markets, and to other services such as Amazon and Hulu.”It’s really going to change the industry,” said Alan Wolk, co-founder of the consulting firm TVREV who follows the sector.Wolk said he sees seven or eight powerful players in streaming which will lead to “huge competition for new shows and hit shows.”These rivals are coming into the segment which has been transformed by the spectacular growth of Netflix and a growing movement by consumers to on-demand television delivered over internet platforms. In the US alone, an estimated six million consumers have dropped pay TV bundles since 2012, while on-demand services such as Netflix, Hulu and Amazon have been surging, according to Leichtman Research.But just as Netflix has disrupted traditional “linear” television, rivals are now moving to disrupt Netflix. Citation: Streaming wars heat up as rivals queue up to challenge Netflix (2019, March 17) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-03-streaming-wars-rivals-netflix.html AT&T to launch streaming service, latest to counter Netflix The streaming service from AT&T’s Warner Media will include programs from HBO such as “Game Of Thrones,” whose star Emilia Clarke is seen here © 2019 AFP This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Remains of Napoleons OneLegged General Found Under Russian Dance Floor

first_img A portrait of Charles Etienne Gudin, who fought in Napoleon’s Grande Armée. Credit: Photo12/UIG/Getty Images Records from the 1812 Russian invasion note that Gudin’s battlefield injuries required him to have his left leg amputated below the knee, Euronews reported. Indeed, the skeleton in the coffin was missing its left leg and showed evidence of injury to the right leg — details that were also mentioned in those records, the archaeologists said, according to Reuters. Moreover, it was “with a high degree of probability” that the remains the team uncovered belonged to an aristocrat and a military veteran of both the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic wars, they said, according to Reuters. “It’s a historic moment not only for me, but for I think for our two countries,” French historian and archaeologist Pierre Malinovsky, who helped find the remains, told the Smolensk newspaper Rabochiy Put (Worker’s Journey), according to Reuters. “Napoleon was one of the last people to see him alive, which is very important, and he’s the first general from the Napoleonic period that we have found.” The general has known living descendants, so researchers plan to test the skeleton for DNA. That way, they’ll be able to say for sure whether the remains are those of Gudin. Gudin, however, is hardly the only French fatality recently found in Russia. Earlier this year, scientists did a virtual facial reconstruction of a man in his 20s who was slashed in the face with a saber and died during the invasion of Russia. 19 of the World’s Oldest Photos Reveal a Rare Side of History An excavation in a peculiar place — under the foundation of a dance floor in Russia — has uncovered the remains of one of Napoleon Bonaparte’s favorite generals: a one-legged man who was killed by a cannonball more than 200 years ago, news sources report. Gen. Charles Etienne Gudin fought with Napoleon during the failed French invasion of Russia in 1812. On July 6 of this year, an international team of French and Russian archaeologists discovered what are believed to be his remains, in Smolensk, a city about 250 miles (400 kilometers) west of Moscow, according to Reuters.Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65920-napoleon-general-found-in-russia.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  After his death at age 44 on Aug. 22, 1812, Gudin got star treatment. His name was inscribed on the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, his bust was placed at the Palace of Versailles, a Paris street was named after him and, as a sentimental gesture, his heart was removed from his body and placed in a chapel at the Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris. [Photos: Archaeologists Excavate Battlefield from Napoleonic Wars] The researchers said that several clues suggested that the skeleton they found under the dance floor belongs to Gudin, who had known Napoleon since childhood. Both men attended the Military School in Brienne, in France’s Champagne region. Upon hearing of Gudin’s death, Napoleon reportedly cried and ordered that his friend’s name be engraved on the Arc de Triomphe, according to Euronews. Photos: Mass Graves Hold 17th-Century Prisoners of War Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoNucificTop Dr. Reveals The 1 Nutrient Your Gut Must HaveNucificUndoLivestlyThe List Of Dog Breeds To Avoid At All CostsLivestlyUndoEditorChoice.comSee What The World’s Largest Dog Looks LikeEditorChoice.comUndo Photos: A 400-Year-Old War Grave Revealedlast_img read more

NDMA warns of heavy rainfall in 16 States including Kerala in next

first_img Heavy to very heavy rains are expected in 16 states, including Kerala, Uttarakhand and West Bengal, in next two days with fishermen are advised not to venture in central Arabian sea, the NDMA said today.In a statement, the National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA) said heavy rains are also expected in large areas along Bay of Bengal.Red warning for heavy to very heavy rain at a few places with extremely heavy falls at isolated places very likely over Uttarakhand tomorrow and Monday, the NDMA said quoting a bulletin of the India Meteorological Department.Rough to very rough sea conditions are likely to prevail over west central Arabian Sea. Fishermen are advised not to venture into this area, it said.Heavy to very heavy rains are likely at isolated places over Uttarakhand, Sub-Himalayan West Bengal, Sikkim, Himachal Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh, Chhattisgarh, Bihar, Jharkhand, Odisha, Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Meghalaya, coastal Andhra Pradesh, coastal Karnataka, Tamil Nadu and Kerala.As many as 718 people have lost their lives in incidents related to floods and rains in seven states during the monsoon season so far.According to the Home Ministry’s National Emergency Response Centre (NERC), 171 people lost their lives in Uttar Pradesh, 170 people have died in West Bengal, 178 have died in Kerala and 139 have died in Maharashtra.As many as 52 people lost their lives in Gujarat, 44 died in Assam and eight perished in Nagaland.A total of 26 people were also missing, Kerala (21) and West Bengal (5), while 244 others received injuries in rain-related incidents in the states, it said. Published on SHARE SHARE EMAIL COMMENTS SHAREcenter_img COMMENT August 11, 2018 weatherlast_img read more

The sole Minister from Telugu States

first_imgelections SHARE SHARE EMAIL Telangana ministers (government) May 31, 2019 Luck smiled on 55-year-old G Kishan Reddy, who lost the Assembly elections in December 2018, came back with an impressive win in the Lok Sabha elections to the Secunderabad constituency and made it to the Cabinet of Prime Minister Narendra Modi, all in under six months. The hard-working, three-time MLA, who was the State President of the BJP in Telangana, and a first time MP is the only minister from the two Telugu States. There were three – Bandaru Dattatreya (BJP) from Telangana, P Ashok Gajapati Raju and YS Chowdhary of the Telugu Desam Party, in the previous ministry. Kishan Reddy is one of the four BJP MPs to get elected from Telangana in a surprise and impressive performance of the party in the April-May general elections. The party, however, failed to win even a single seat from AP. Kishan Reddy’s induction is expected to boost the party cadre morale. According to BJP insiders, like his predecessor Bandaru Dattatreya, Kishan Reddy has a wide reach among people, including the minorities, in Hyderabad. From his days in the Bharatiya Janata Yuva Morcha, Kishan Reddy has good rapport with Narendra Modi. During one Assembly tenure in the United AP, he was the lone member from the BJP. Published on government BJP MP from Secunderabad in Telangana G Kishan Reddy takes oath as Union minister during the swearing-in ceremony   –  – politics COMMENT SHARE COMMENTSlast_img read more